Monday, September 1, 2014

jedavu:

Modern Remakes Of Famous Paintings by The Booooooom + Adobe 

Sunday, August 31, 2014
wehadfacesthen:

Burt Lancaster and Ava Gardner in The Killers (Robert Siodmak, 1946)

wehadfacesthen:

Burt Lancaster and Ava Gardner in The Killers (Robert Siodmak, 1946)

Saturday, August 30, 2014

houseshape:

New York, I Love You But You’re Bringing Me Down - LCD Soundsystem

Friday, August 29, 2014
algemesii1:

Iggy Pop And The Stooges 1969-1970

algemesii1:

Iggy Pop And The Stooges 1969-1970

Thursday, August 28, 2014
tierradentro:

“Harlequin’s Death”, 1906, Pablo Picasso.
#deathinart

tierradentro:

Harlequin’s Death”, 1906, Pablo Picasso.

#deathinart

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

climateadaptation:

Civet Coffee denounced by inventor, want’s to end animal cruelty. Civet coffee is the most expensive coffee in the world. A rare animal called a “civet” swallows coffee cherries, which contain the seed used to make coffee (aka coffee beans). The animal can’t digest the seeds, so it craps them out. These seeds are then collected, roasted, and sold for about $150 a pound.

 Civet coffee: why it’s time to cut the crap 

When I introduced civet coffee to the UK it was a quirky novelty. Now it’s overpriced, industrialised, cruel – and frequently inauthentic. That’s really hard to stomach

I am today launching a campaign (pdf) aimed at ending an industry that I created. That trade is in kopi luwak, AKA civet coffee – otherwise known as “wolf”, “cat”, and “crap” coffee, and the most expensive coffee in the world.

Over the past 20 years Kopi Luwak has become the ultimate bling coffee, a celebrity in its own right, stocked by every aspiring speciality retailer worldwide, and appearing on CNN News, Oprah, and The Bucket List (a Hollywood film with Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman, no less).

To my regret, I was the one who started it all …

Via The Guardian

Tuesday, August 26, 2014
transistoradio:

Ken Price (1935-2012), Acrobatic Figurine Cups (1970), colour lithograph on paper, 45.7 x 55.9 cm. Collection of Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, USA. Via Smithsonian.

transistoradio:

Ken Price (1935-2012), Acrobatic Figurine Cups (1970), colour lithograph on paper, 45.7 x 55.9 cm. Collection of Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, USA. Via Smithsonian.

failnation:

The gang’s all herehttp://failnation.tumblr.com

Kate Bush- Running Up That Hill (BBC Documentary)

Feat. David Gilmour, Peter Gabriel, Elton John, Tori Amos, Natasha Khan (Bat for lashes), Annie Clark (St-Vincent) ,Tricky and others

Monday, August 25, 2014
Sunday, August 24, 2014
bpod-mrc:

23 June 2014
Wiping Out Worms
Lymphatic filariasis, (also known as elephantiasis) a parasitic infection caused by three types of roundworms Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and B. timori, affects over 120 million people worldwide. The adult worms dwell in the lymphatic system blocking lymph nodes causing swelling or lymphoedema. Female worms can produce millions of microfilariae [baby worms] – here seen being attacked by a cell of the immune system – that circulate in the blood. Mosquitoes, if feeding from an infected bloodstream, acquire microfilariae, and can spread them to other humans. Currently, drugs are being used to reduce the number of microfilariae in the blood. However, research now shows that insecticide-treated bed-nets, targeting mosquito vectors, also strongly affects the spread of lymphatic filariasis. Shortening the mosquitoes’ life-span interrupted the progression of microfilariae into infective worms. Combining mosquito-thwarting bed-nets with the worm-reducing drugs could be a powerful new approach towards the elimination of this disfiguring, disabling disease.
Written by Katie Panteli
—
Image by Eye of ScienceScience Photo LibraryAny re-use of this image must be authorised by Science Photo LibraryResearch published in The New England Journal of Medicine, August 2013
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

23 June 2014

Wiping Out Worms

Lymphatic filariasis, (also known as elephantiasis) a parasitic infection caused by three types of roundworms Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and B. timori, affects over 120 million people worldwide. The adult worms dwell in the lymphatic system blocking lymph nodes causing swelling or lymphoedema. Female worms can produce millions of microfilariae [baby worms] – here seen being attacked by a cell of the immune system – that circulate in the blood. Mosquitoes, if feeding from an infected bloodstream, acquire microfilariae, and can spread them to other humans. Currently, drugs are being used to reduce the number of microfilariae in the blood. However, research now shows that insecticide-treated bed-nets, targeting mosquito vectors, also strongly affects the spread of lymphatic filariasis. Shortening the mosquitoes’ life-span interrupted the progression of microfilariae into infective worms. Combining mosquito-thwarting bed-nets with the worm-reducing drugs could be a powerful new approach towards the elimination of this disfiguring, disabling disease.

Written by Katie Panteli

Image by Eye of Science
Science Photo Library
Any re-use of this image must be authorised by Science Photo Library
Research published in The New England Journal of Medicine, August 2013

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

darthxinvader:

Realistic 

1)  The day my sister got back from the hospital after a suicide attempt. I didnt let go for about an hour.

2) Kid just found out his brother was shot and killed.

3) A Russian war veteran kneels beside the tank he spent the war in, now a monument.

4) Man sobbing at animal shelter. After being jailed briefly and his dog Buzz Lightyear impounded he couldn’t afford the $400 to get his pet back.

5) A firefighter gives water to a koala during the devastating Black Saturday bushfires that burned across Victoria, Australia, in 2009.

6) Alcoholic father with his son

7) Robert Peraza pauses at his son’s name on the 9/11 Memorial during the tenth anniversary ceremonies at the site of the World Trade Center.

8) Greg Cook hugs his dog Coco after finding her inside his destroyed home in Alabama following the Tornado in March, 2012

9) After two double lung transplants and years of battling cystic fibrosis, my good friend passed away last Saturday. This was one of the last pics taken with his mother.

These are probably some of the most powerful pictures I’ve ever seen and some hit close to home.

(Source: stochasticvariable)